Greek Dictionary (Lexicon-Concordance)

#G5750 - #G5799

G5750


 5750
      Tense - Present (See G5774)
      Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
      Mood  - Infinitive (See G5795)
      Count - 135

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5751


 5751
      Tense - Present (See G5774)
      Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
      Mood  - Optative (See G5793)
      Count - 12

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5752


 5752
      Tense - Present (See G5774)
      Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
      Mood  - Participle (See G5796)
      Count - 186

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5753


 5753
      Tense - Present (See G5774)
      Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
      Mood  - Subjunctive (See G5792)
      Count - 68

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5754


 5754
      Tense - Second Perfect (See G5782)
      Voice - Active (See G5784)
      Mood  - Indicative (See G5791)
      Count - 97

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5755


 5755
      Tense - Second Perfect (See G5782)
      Voice - Active (See G5784)
      Mood  - Infinitive (See G5795)
      Count - 8

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5756


 5756
      Tense - Second Perfect (See G5782)
      Voice - Active (See G5784)
      Mood  - Participle (See G5796)
      Count - 43

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5757


 5757
      Tense - Second Perfect (See G5782)
      Voice - Passive (See G5786)
      Mood  - Participle (See G5796)
      Count - 1

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5758


 5758
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Active (See G5784)
      Mood  - Indicative (See G5791)
      Count - 516

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5759


 5759
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Active (See G5784)
      Mood  - Imperative (See G5794)
      Count - 1

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5760


 5760
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Active (See G5784)
      Mood  - Infinitive (See G5795)
      Count - 30

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5761


 5761
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Active (See G5784)
      Mood  - Participle (See G5796)
      Count - 193

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5762


 5762
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Active (See G5784)
      Mood  - Subjunctive (See G5792)
      Count - 10

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5763


 5763
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Middle Deponent (See G5788)
      Mood  - Indicative (See G5791)
      Count - 1

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5764


 5764
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Middle (See G5785)
      Mood  - Indicative (See G5791)
      Count - 1

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5765


 5765
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Middle (See G5785)
      Mood  - Participle (See G5796)
      Count - 5

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5766


 5766
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
      Mood  - Indicative (See G5791)
      Count - 19

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5767


 5767
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
      Mood  - Infinitive (See G5795)
      Count - 0

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5768


 5768
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent (See G5790)
      Mood  - Participle (See G5796)
      Count - 4

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5769


 5769
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Passive (See G5786)
      Mood  - Indicative (See G5791)
      Count - 215

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5770


 5770
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Passive (See G5786)
      Mood  - Imperative (See G5794)
      Count - 3

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5771


 5771
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Passive (See G5786)
      Mood  - Infinitive (See G5795)
      Count - 9

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5772


 5772
      Tense - Perfect (See G5778)
      Voice - Passive (See G5786)
      Mood  - Participle (See G5796)
      Count - 463

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5773


 5773
      Tense - No Tense Stated (See G5799)
      Voice - No Voice Stated (See G5799)
      Mood  - Imperative (See G5794)
      Count - 22

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5774


 5774 Tense - Present

     The present tense represents a simple statement of fact
     or reality viewed as occurring in actual time.  In most cases
     this corresponds directly with the English present tense.

     Some phrases which might be rendered as past tense in English
     will often occur in the present tense in Greek.  These are
     termed "historical presents," and such occurrences dramatize
     the event described as if the reader were there watching the
     event occur.  Some English translations render such historical
     presents in the English past tense, while others permit the
     tense to remain in the present.

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5775


 5775 Tense - Imperfect

     The imperfect tense generally represents continual or repeated
     action.  Where the present tense might indicate "they are
     asking," the imperfect would indicate "they kept on asking."

     In the case of the verb "to be," however, the imperfect tense
     is used as a general past tense and does not carry the
     connotation of continual or repeated action.

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5776


 5776 Tense - Future

     The future tense corresponds to the English future, and
     indicates the contemplated or certain occurrence of an event
     which has not yet occurred.

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5777


 5777 Tense - Aorist

     The aorist tense is characterized by its emphasis on punctiliar
     action; that is, the concept of the verb is considered without
     regard for past, present, or future time.  There is no
     direct or clear English equivalent for this tense, though it is
     generally rendered as a simple past tense in most translations.

     The events described by the aorist tense are classified into a
     number of categories by grammarians.  The most common of these

     include a view of the action as having begun from a certain
     point ("inceptive aorist"), or having ended at a certain point
     ("cumulative aorist"), or merely existing at a certain point
     ("punctiliar aorist").  The categorization of other cases can
     be found in Greek reference grammars.

     The English reader need not concern himself with most of these
     finer points concerning the aorist tense, since in most cases
     they cannot be rendered accurately in English translation,
     being fine points of Greek exegesis only.  The common practice
     of rendering an aorist by a simple English past tense should
     suffice in most cases.

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5778


 5778 Tense - Perfect

     The perfect tense in Greek corresponds to the perfect tense in
     English, and describes an action which is viewed as having been
     completed in the past, once and for all, not needing to be
     repeated.

     Jesus' last cry from the cross, TETELESTAI ("It is finished!")
     is a good example of the perfect tense used in this sense,
     namely "It [the atonement] has been accomplished, completely,
     once and for all time."

     Certain antiquated verb forms in Greek, such as those related
     to seeing (eidw) or knowing (oida) will use the perfect tense
     in a manner equivalent to the normal past tense.  These few
     cases are exception to the normal rule and do not alter the
     normal connotation of the perfect tense stated above.

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5779


 5779 Tense - Pluperfect

     The pluperfect tense in Greek occurs rarely.  It corresponds
     in a single Greek word to the sense of the English pluperfect,
     which indicates an event viewed as having been once and for
     all accomplished in past time.  In contrast, the perfect tense
     reflects the final completion of an action at the present
     moment described.

     In translation the Greek pluperfect may not always follow the
     rendering of the English pluperfect, due to excessive wordiness.
     The English pluperfect is normally formed with the past tense
     of the "helping" verbs "to have" or "to be," plus the past
     participle, e.g., "He had finished."   The English perfect
     is formed by the present tense of the helping verb plus the
     past participle, e.g., "He has finished."

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5780


 5780 Tense - Second Aorist

     The "second aorist" tense is identical in meaning and
     translation to the normal or "first" aorist tense.  The only
     difference is in the form of spelling the words in Greek, and
     there is no effect upon English translation.

     See "Aorist" # G5777

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5781


 5781 Tense - Second Future

     The "second future" is identical in meaning to that of the
     normal or "first" future tense.  The classification merely
     reflects a spelling variation in Greek of the "first future"
     tense, and has no effect on English meaning beyond that of the
     normal future.

     See "Future" # G5776

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5782


 5782 Tense - Second Perfect

     The second perfect is identical in meaning to that of the
     normal or "first" perfect tense, and has no additional effect
     on English translation.  The classification merely represents
     a spelling variation in Greek.

     See "Perfect" # G5778

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5783


 5783 Tense - Second Pluperfect

     The second pluperfect is identical in meaning to that of the
     normal or "first" pluperfect tense.  It has no additional
     meaning or effect on English translation, and merely reflects
     a spelling variation in Greek.

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5784


 5784 Voice - Active

     The active voice represents the subject as the doer or
     performer of the action.  E.g., in the sentence, "The
     boy hit the ball," the boy performs the action.

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5785


 5785 Voice - Middle

     The middle voice indicates the subject performing an action
     upon himself (reflexive action) or for his own benefit.  E.g.,
     "The boy groomed himself."  Many verbs which occur only in
     middle voice forms are translated in English as having an
     active sense; these are called "deponent" verbs, and do not
     comply with the normal requirements for the middle voice.

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5786


 5786 Voice - Passive

     The passive voice represents the subject as being the
     recipient of the action.  E.g., in the sentence, "The boy was
     hit by the ball," the boy receives the action.

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5787


 5787 Voice - Either Middle or Passive

     Many of the so-called "deponent" verbs can have either a
     middle or passive form.  These are normally translated as
     having an active voice, since they have no active form in
     their outward spelling.  At times, however, they retain their
     middle or passive significance.

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5788


 5788 Voice - Middle Deponent

     The middle deponent forms in almost all cases are translated
     as being in the active voice.

     See "Active" # G5784

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5789


 5789 Voice - Passive Deponent

     The passive deponent forms in almost all cases are translated
     as being in the passive voice.

     See "Passive" # G5786

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5790


 5790 Voice - Middle or Passive Deponent

     The middle or passive deponent forms in almost all cases are
     translated as being in the active voice.

     See "Active" # G5784

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5791


 5791 Mood - Indicative

     The indicative mood is a simple statement of fact.  If an
     action really occurs or has occurred or will occur, it will be
     rendered in the indicative mood.

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5792


 5792 Mood - Subjunctive

     The subjunctive mood is the mood of possibility and
     potentiality.  The action described may or may not occur,
     depending upon circumstances.  Conditional sentences of the
     third class ("ean" + the subjunctive) are all of this type, as
     well as many commands following conditional purpose clauses,
     such as those beginning with "hina."

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5793


 5793 Mood - Optative

     The optative mood is generally used in the so-called
     "fourth-class" conditions which express a wish or desire for
     an action to occur in which the completion of such is
     doubtful.  By the time of the New Testament, the optative mood
     was beginning to disappear from spoken and written Greek, and
     such rarely occurs in the New Testament.

     In a few cases, verbs in the optative mood stand apart from a
     conditional clause to express the strongest possible wish
     regarding an event.  The most common of these appears in the
     phrase "mh genoito" (AV, "God forbid"; NKJV "Certainly not").

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5794


 5794 Mood - Imperative

     The imperative mood corresponds to the English imperative, and
     expresses a command to the hearer to perform a certain action
     by the order and authority of the one commanding.  Thus,
     Jesus' phrase, "Repent ye, and believe the gospel" (Mk. 1:15)
     is not at all an "invitation," but an absolute command
     requiring full obedience on the part of all hearers.

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5795


 5795 Mood - Infinitive

     The Greek infinitive mood in most cases corresponds to the
     English infinitive, which is basically the verb with "to"
     prefixed, as "to believe."

     Like the English infinitive, the Greek infinitive can be used
     like a noun phrase ("It is better to live than to die"), as
     well as to reflect purpose or result ("This was done to
     fulfil what the prophet said").

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5796


 5796 Mood - Participle

     The Greek participle corresponds for the most part to the
     English participle, reflecting "-ing" or "-ed" being suffixed
     to the basic verb form.  The participle can be used either
     like a verb or a noun, as in English, and thus is often termed
     a "verbal noun."

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5797


 5797 Mood - Impersonal

     The impersonal mood is used only in a few verb forms which do
     not conjugate in the full sense.  The most common of these is
     the Greek word "dei," which is most often rendered "it is
     necessary" or "one must."

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5798


 5798 Mood - Imperative-Sense Participle

     This reflects a Greek participle which implies that a command
     to perform the action is implicit, even though it is not
     outwardly or directly expressed.

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


G5799


 5799 No Tense or Voice Stated

     In a number of places certain verbs are cited in Perschbacher's
     "The New Analytical Greek Lexicon" which do not have any tense
     or voice directly stated.

     In almost all of these cases, one can assume that the tense is
     Present and the voice is Active, especially when the sense is
     that of a command (Imperative).

     See "Present" # G5774
     See "Active"  # G5784

—Greek Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


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