Hebrew & Aramaic Dictionary (Lexicon-Concordance)

#H8800 - #H8849

H8800


  #8800
       Stem  - Qal (See H8851)
       Mood  - Infinitive (See H8812)
       Count - 4888

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8801


  #8801
       Stem  - Qal (See H8851)
       Mood  - Participle (See H8813)
       Count - 309

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8802


  #8802
       Stem  - Qal (See H8851)
       Mood  - Participle Active (See H8814)
       Count - 5386

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8803


  #8803
       Stem  - Qal (See H8851)
       Mood  - Participle Passive (See H8815)
       Count - 1415

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8804


  #8804
       Stem  - Qal (See H8851)
       Mood  - Perfect (See H8816)
       Count - 12562

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8805


  #8805
       Stem  - Shaphel (See H8852)
       Mood  - Infinitive (See H8812)
       Count - 2

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8806


  #8806
       Stem  - Shaphel (See H8852)
       Mood  - Perfect (See H8816)
       Count - 4

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8807


  #8807
       Stem  - Tiphel (See H8853)
       Mood  - Imperfect (See H8811)
       Count - 1

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8808


  #8808
       Stem  - Tiphel (See H8853)
       Mood  - Participle (See H8813)
       Count - 1

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8809


  #8809
       Stem  - Tiphel (See H8853)
       Mood  - Perfect (See H8816)
       Count - 1

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8810


  #8810 Imperative

 This verb class indicates an order or a command.

   Go up to the city.
   Wash yourself.

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8811


  #8811 Imperfect

 The imperfect expresses an action, process or condition which is
 incomplete, and it has a wide range of meaning:

 1a) It is used to describe a single (as opposed to a repeated) action
     in the past; it differs from the perfect in being more vivid and
     pictorial. The perfect expresses the "fact", the imperfect adds
     colour and movement by suggesting the "process" preliminary to its
     completion.

      he put forth his hand to the door
      it came to a halt
      I began to hear

 1b) A phrase such as "What seekest thou?", refers not only to the
     present, but assumes that the search has continued for some time.

      Why do you weep?
      Why refuse to eat?
      Why are you distressed?

    These relate not so much as to one occasion, as to a
    continued condition.

 2) The kind of progression or imperfection and unfinished condition
    of the action may consist it its frequent repetition.

     2a) In the present:

         it is "said" today
         a wise son "maketh glad" his father

     2b) In the past:

         "and so he did"        -  regularly, year by year
         a mist "used to go up"
         the fish which "we used to eat"
         the manna "came down"  - regularly
         he "spoke"             - repeatedly

 3) The imperfect is used to express the "future", referring not only
    to an action which is about to be accomplished but one which has
    not yet begun:

     3a) This may be a future from the point of view of the real
         present; as:

           Now "shalt thou see what I will do"
           "We will burn" thy house

     3b) It may be a future from any other point of view assumed; as:

           he took his son the "was to reign"
           she stayed to see what "should be done"

 4) The usage of 3b may be taken as the transitive to a common use of
    the imperfect in which it serves for an expression of those shades
    of relation among acts and thoughts for which English prefers the
    conditional moods. Such actions are strictly "future" in reference
    to the assumed point of relation, and the simple imperfect
    sufficiently expresses them; e.g.

        of every tree thou "mayest eat"
        "could we know"
        he "would" say

 5a) The imperfect follows particles expressing "transition",
     "purpose", "result" and so forth as, "in order that", "lest"; e.g.

        say thou art my sister, "that it may be well with thee"
        let us deal wisely with the nation, "lest it multiples"

 5b) When however there is a strong feeling of "purpose", or when it
     is meant to be strongly marked, then of course the moods are
     employed; e.g.

        raise me up "that I may requite them"
        who will entice Ahab "that he may go up"
        what shall we do "that the see may be calm"

     The moods are also employed to express that class of
     future actions which we express in the "optative"

        "may I die"
        "may" the LORD "establish" his word
        "may" the child "live"

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8812


  #8812 Infinitive

 There are two forms of the infinitive:

 1a) Infinitive Construct is used as a verbal noun corresponding
     to the English verbal noun ending in "-ing"

     1a1) as subject
          to keep the judgments
          to seek thy heart

     1a2) as object
          in his "writing"
          he spoke, "saying"

 1b) The Infinitive Absolute does not allow prefixes or suffixes

     1b1) Used with a verb  to emphasize the verbal idea. This is often
          rendered by an English adverb , such as, "surely", "utterly".

               he will surely visit you
               he utterly destroyed the people

     1b2) It may be used by itself with the value of a finite form of
          the verb, especially an imperative.

               remember the sabbath day

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8813


  #8813 Participle

 1) The participle represents an action or condition in its unbroken
    continuity, and corresponds to the English verb, "to be" with the
    present participle. It may be used of present, past or future time.

    1a) present time
        what are you doing
    1b) past time
        "he was still speaking" when another came
    1c) future time
        we are destroying - e.g. are about to destroy

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8814


  #8814 Participle Active

 Active form of the participle. See H8813 for description of
 participle.

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8815


  #8815 Participle Passive

 Passive form of the participle. See H8813 for description of participle.

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8816


  #8816 Perfect

 The Perfect expresses a completed action.

 1) In reference to time such an action me be:

    1a) one just completed from the standpoint of the present
          "I have come" to tell you the news

    1b) one completed in the more or less distant past
          in the beginning God "created"
          "I was (once) young" and "I have (now) grown old" but
            "I have not seen" a righteous man forsaken

    1c) one already completed from the point of view of another
        past act
          God saw everything that "he had made"

    1d) one completed from the point of view of another action
        yet future
          I will draw for thy camels also until "they have done"
            drinking

 2) The perfect is often used where the present is employed in
    English.

    2a) in the case of general truths or actions of frequent
        occurrence -- truths or actions which have been often
        experienced or observed
           the grass "withereth"
           the sparrow "findeth" a house

    2b) an action or attitude of the past may be continued into
        the present
           "I stretch out" my hands to thee
           "thou never forsakest" those who seek thee

    2c) the perfect of intransitive verbs is used where English
        uses the present; The perfect in Hebrew in such a case
        emphasises a condition which has come into "complete
        existence" and realisation
           "I know" thou wilt be king
           "I hate" all workers of iniquity

    2d) Sometimes in Hebrew, future events are conceived so
        vividly and so realistically that they are regarded as
        having virtually taken place and are described by the
        perfect.

        2d1) in promises, threats and language of contracts
            the field "give I" thee
            and if not, "I will take it"

        2d2) prophetic language
             my people "is gone into captivity"
                (i.e. shall assuredly go)

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8817


  #8817 Aphel

 In Biblical Aramaic (Chaldean), the Aphel is a causative conjugation
 like the Hebrew Hiphil, but with the letter Aleph substituted for the
 initial He.  Other changes in spelling also occur, but otherwise the
 verb functions similarly to the Hebrew Hiphil, expressing
 causative action.

 See Hiphil H8818

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8818


  #8818 Hiphil

 a) Hiphil usually expresses the "causative" action of Qal - see H8851

    Qal                Hiphil

    he ate             he caused to eat, he fed
    he came            he caused to come, he brought
    he reigned         he made king, he crowned

 b) Hiphil is often used to form verbs from nouns and adjectives.

    Noun or Adjective  Hiphil

    ear                to listen (lend an ear)
    far                to remove oneself, put far away

 c) Some "simple" verbs are found in Hiphil.

    to cast, to destroy, to get up early, to explain, to tell

 The form accounts for 13.3% of the verbs parsed.

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8819


  #8819 Hithpael

 a) This form primarily expresses a "reflexive" action of Qal or Piel
       See for Qal  H8851
       See for Piel H8840

    Qal                Hithpael

    he wore            he dressed himself
    he washed          he washed himself
    he fell            he flung himself, he fell upon, he attacked
    he sold            he sold himself, he devoted himself

 b) It expresses a reciprocal action.

    they saw           they looked upon one another
    they whispered     they whispered one to another

 c) Some verbs in Hithpael are translated as a simple action. The
    reflexive action os understood.

    he prayed, he mourned, he became angry

 This form accounts for 1.4% of the verbs parsed.

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8820


  #8820 Hithpalel

 This Hebrew form is equivalent in use to the Hithpael, and is
 causative/reflexive in meaning.  The separate term occurs because
 certain verb forms reduplicate their final consonant and change into
 a quadriliteral (4-letter) root rather than the normal triliteral
 (3-letter) root form.

 See Hithpael H8819

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8821


  #8821 Hithpalpel

 This Hebrew form is equivalent in use to the Hithpael, and is
 causative/reflexive in meaning.  The separate term occurs because
 certain verb forms reduplicate their final syllable (final two root
 letters) and change the normal triliteral (3-letter) root form
 into a reduplicated two-letter root.

 See Hithpael H8819

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8822


  #8822 Hithpeil

 In Biblical Aramaic (Chaldean), this form is a passive causative/
 reflexive conjugation like the Hebrew Hophal.  The verb functions
 similarly to the Hebrew Hophal, expressing passive causative
 action, but with the effect of the action upon oneself, being
 reflexive.

 See Hophal H8825
 See Hithpael H8819

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8823


  #8823 Hithpoel

 A Hebrew intensive reflexive stem, caused by the lengthening of the
 final vowel in the second syllable of the triliteral (3-letter) root.
 This form functions similarly to the Hithpael.

 See Hithpael H8819

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8824


  #8824 Hithpolel

 This Hebrew form is equivalent in use to the Hithpael, and is
 causative/reflexive in meaning.  The separate term occurs because
 certain verb forms reduplicate their final consonant and change into
 a quadriliteral (4-letter) root rather than the normal triliteral
 (3-letter) root form.  This form additionally lengthens the initial
 vowel in the first consonant.

 See Hithpael H8819

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8825


  #8825 Hophal

 Hophal is the "passive" of Hiphil - see H8818

 Hiphil              Hophal

 he told             it was told
 he threw            he was thrown

 This form is accounts for 0.6% of the verbs parsed.

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8826


  #8826 Hothpael

 This is a passive form of the Hithpael, indicating a passive
 intensive reflexive receiving of action upon the subject.  It thus
 combines the features of both the Hithpael and the Hophal.

 See Hithpael H8819
 See Hophal H8825

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8827


  #8827 Ishtaphel

 In Aramaic (Chaldean), this form is similar to the Hebrew Hithpael,
 with its form altered due to an initial Aleph and a metathesized
 (reversed) Tau and Shin. This form occurs only rarely with verbs
 meeting particular spelling qualities.

 See Hithpael H8819

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8828


  #8828 Ithpael

 In Aramaic (Chaldean), this form is similar to the Hebrew Hithpael,
 with its form altered due to an initial Aleph. This form reflects the
 intensive causative, and occurs only rarely with verbs meeting
 particular spelling qualities.

 See Hithpael H8819

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8829


  #8829 Ithpeal

 In Aramaic (Chaldean), this form is similar to the Hebrew Hithpael,
 with its form altered due to an initial Aleph. However, this form
 reflects only the intensive reflexive of the common stem (Peal =
 Hebrew Qal).  This form occurs only rarely with verbs meeting
 particular spelling qualities.

 See Hithpael H8819
 See Qal H8851

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8830


  #8830 Ithpeel

 In Aramaic (Chaldean), this form is similar to the Hebrew Hithpael,
 with its form altered due to an initial Aleph. However, this form
 reflects only the reflexive of the intensive stem, and functions like

 a Hebrew Piel and Hithpael combined.

 See Hithpael H8819
 See Piel H8840

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8831


  #8831 Ithpeil

 In Aramaic (Chaldean), this form is similar to the Hebrew Hithpael,
 with its form altered due to an initial Aleph. However, this form
 reflects only the passive intensive reflexive, and functions like the
 Hithpael and Hophal combined.

 See Hithpael H8819
 See Hophal H8825

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8832


  #8832 Ithpolel

 This Aramaic (Chaldean) form is equivalent in use to the Hebrew
 Hithpolel, and is causative/reflexive in meaning like the Hithpael.
 The separate term occurs because certain verb forms reduplicate their
 final consonant and change into a quadriliteral (4-letter) root
 rather than the normal triliteral (3-letter) root form.  This form
 additionally lengthens the initial vowel in the first consonant.

 See Hithpael H8819
 See Hithpolel H8824

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8833


  #8833 Niphal

 a) Niphal is the "passive" of Qal - see H8851

    Qal                    Niphal

    he saw                 he was seen, he appeared
    he saw the angel       the angel was seen
    he sent                he was sent
    he created             it was created

 b) Niphal sometimes expresses a "reflexive" action.

    he guarded             he was guarded, also
                           he guarded himself

 c) Several verbs use Niphal, although they express simple action
    and are active in English. Common examples are:

    he fought, he remained, he swore, he entered

 This form accounts for 6.0% of the verbs parsed.

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8834


  #8834 Nithpael

 This form is a passive intensive reflexive, combining both the
 qualities of the Niphal and Hithpael.  Example: Eze. 23:48, "that
 they may be taught" (= caused to learn).

 See Niphal H8833
 See Hithpael H8819

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8835


  #8835 Pael

 In Aramaic (Chaldean), the intensive form of the verb, equivalent of
 the Hebrew Piel.

 See Piel H8840

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8836


  #8836 Palpal

 A form of a triliteral verb such as "palal" which reduplicates the
 first syllable for euphony.  This form otherwise functions like the
 normal Qal stem.

 See Qal H8851

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8837


  #8837 Peal

 In Aramaic (Chaldean), this form represents the base stem of the
 verb, and is equivalent to the Hebrew Qal stem.

 See Qal H8851

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8838


  #8838 Peel Or Peil

 In Aramaic (Chaldean), this stem reflects the Passive Intensive form,
 and is equivalent to the Hebrew Pual.

 See Pual H8849

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8839


  #8839 Peil

 In Aramaic (Chaldean), this stem reflects the Intensive form, and is
 equivalent to the Hebrew Piel.

 See Piel H8840

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8840


  #8840 Piel

 a) Piel usually expresses an "intensive" or "intentional" action.

    Qal                  Piel

    he broke             he broke to pieces, he smashed
    he sent              he sent away, he expelled

 b) Sometimes the Piel introduces a new meaning to the Qal form.

    he counted           he recounted, he told
    he completed         he paid, he compensated
    he learned           he taught

 c) Piel expresses a "repeated" or "extended" action.

    he jumped            he skipped, he hopped

 d) Some intransitive verbs in Qal become transitive in Piel.

    to be strong         to strengthen, to fortify
    to become great      to make great

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8841


  #8841 Pilel

 This form is equivalent to the Piel intensive form, and occurs due
 to reduplication of the final root letter.

 See Piel H8840

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8842


  #8842 Pilpel

 This form is equivalent to the Piel intensive form, and occurs due
 to reduplication of the final root syllable.

 See Piel H8840

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8843


  #8843 Poal

 This form is the passive of the Poel, and functions much like the
 normal Pual.

 See Pual H8849
 See Poel H8845

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8844


  #8844 Poalal

 This form is identical to the Poal, but reduplicates the final root
 syllable.  It functions much like the normal Pual.

 See Poal H8843
 See Pual H8849

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8845


  #8845 Poel

 This form functions much like the normal Piel, and arises only due to
 certain internal vowel changes.

 See Piel H8840

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8846


  #8846 Polal

 This form is identical to the Poal, but reduplicates the final root
 letter.  It functions much like the normal Pual.

 See Poal H8843
 See Pual H8849

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8847


  #8847 Polel

 This form reduplicates the final root letter, but functions like the
 normal Piel.

 See Piel H8840

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8848


  #8848 Polpal

 This form reduplicates the initial root syllable, and functions like
 the normal Pual.

 See Pual H8849

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


H8849


  #8849 Pual

 Pual is the "passive" of Piel - see H8840

 Piel            Pual

 he smashed      it was smashed
 he told         it was told

 This form accounts for 0.7% of the verbs parsed.

—Hebrew Word Study (Grammatical Reference)


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